‘The last six days have been hell,’ community activist who guarded Maponya mall tells Ramaphosa

‘The last six days have been hell,’ community activist who guarded Maponya mall tells Ramaphosa

Nhlanhla Lux Dlamini, president of the Pimville Parliament movement, mobilized his community to look after the Maponya Mall in Soweto and protect it from looters.


Nhlanhla Lux Dlamini, president of the Pimville Parliament movement, mobilized his community to look after the Maponya Mall in Soweto and protect it from looters.

  • Pimville residents this week took a stand and guarded Maponya Mall from the rampant looting and unrest that was spreading to other malls in Soweto. 
  • Nhlanhla Lux Dlamini has led the charge, and been vocal on the modus operandi of those motivated to loot and destroy properties.
  • Ramaphosa told Dlamini that South Africa was in good hands with young leaders like him in the country. 

Nhlanhla Lux Dlamini, the man who lead the community charge that protected Maponya Mall from being looted told President Cyril Ramaphosa that the last week has been hell for him. 

“It’s been six days of hell for some of us, sleepless nights. The president is here and people come out of their houses. Where were they when we were protecting these malls? These are people our age, they take guns and fire them in the air but these guns can’t come and defend our township economy,” he said. 

READ | Former Orlando Pirates’ Lucky Lekgwathi heartbroken over looted restaurant – ‘I was trying to create jobs’

Dlamini briefly spoke to the president at Maponya Mall where Ramaphosa concluded his tour of malls in Soweto that were affected by the looting and unrest earlier in the week. Maponya Mall was one of the few malls in the township that weren’t looted because the community stood guard and protected it. 

He said that an “unknown enemy” had infiltrated the community, encouraging it to loot. 

“We were infiltrated and young people are saying they apologise for taking part in this looting because the community was infiltrated, their minds were also infiltrated but I am happy that we went through this lesson and we are going to learn from this lesson,” he said. 

unrest,zuma,riots,looting,protests

Outside Maponya mall where Zizi Kodwa addressed residents.

Dlamini also urged to the president to address the narrative that ethnicity was behind some of the violence. 

“There is a narrative that says that even though this enemy is invincible there a people saying ‘hayi maZulu’ and you need to address that because in the front line of the Zulu nation remains to be one of the only industries that are proudly black-owned and black-operated being the taxi industry. The taxi industry has been with us here fighting this enemy.

He said:

When we are up and down being shot they protect us at night and that story is not told because the story being told in media and on the ground is that we are at war with Zulu people and I want to stop that with immediate effect,.

 

Later during their interaction, Ramaphosa responded saying ethnicity had nothing to do with the unrest. This was a different tune from what he had previously said when addressing the nation shortly after the unrest began. 

Sparked by protests of pro-Zuma supporters who were calling for the former president to be released from his 15-month jail sentence, some believed that the widespread looting was being led by a small group of KwaZulu-Natal supporters. Ramaphosa in his address acknowledged that some of the unrest that had transpired had been “caused by ethnic mobilisation” at the time. 

Ramaphosa thanked Dlamini and other community members for protecting the mall.

“You represent the future and I am glad to know that we are going to hand over this future to people like you who are going to defend our economy but also our democracy. So thank you very much for standing firm and doing what you are doing,” he said.

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *