Personal Development & Minimalism • A podcast on Anchor

Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You to be Rich shares how to set smaller goals.
Episode 1041: Set Smaller Goals: Impress Friends, Get Girls, Lose Weight by Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You To Be Rich
Ramit wants to use money to say YES. He knew there was a better way to live a rich life—if we could use psychology to focus on what actually works. Not just for personal finance, but all aspects of life: money, careers, relationships, business, fitness, and more.
Since then, he’s been testing and sharing his findings with the world via I Will Teach You To Be Rich.
He’s also written a New York Times bestselling book, been profiled in a 6-page Fortune article, and been pictured next to Warren Buffett in Forbes Magazine, as well as been featured by a long list of media, including the Wall Street Journal, ABC News, NPR, Fox Business, PBS, CNBC, and more. He also has tons of documented success stories—more than 20,000.
The original post is located here: https://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog/set-smaller-goals-impress-friends-get-girls-lose-weight/
Please Rate & Review the Show!
Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group
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Trump’s lawyers say court wrongly sided with Manhattan DA over financial records


“In evaluating whether the President stated claims for overbreadth and bad faith, the district court imposed a withering standard of review that wouldn’t have been used against any ‘other citizen,’ ” Trump’s attorneys wrote.

Trump’s filing is the latest step in an extended legal tussle with the district attorney’s office that will result in oral arguments Tuesday over Trump’s request for a stay pending appeal before a three-judge panel on the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals.

In their filing Monday, Trump’s attorneys also warned that the President would suffer “irreparable harm” if the stay isn’t granted, arguing that “while destruction or return of documents can provide a ‘partial remedy’ for the ‘invasion of privacy,’ … the harm the President seeks to prevent is use of these records to engage in a bad-faith fishing expedition. The Court ‘cannot unring that bell’ even if the subpoena is eventually invalidated.”

They also raised the possibility that the district attorney’s office could disclose the records, saying New York law “doesn’t strictly forbid the disclosure of records produced to the grand jury,” and that such information could become public through an indictment or a grand-jury report.

“For the District Attorney’s argument to even get out of the starting gate, then, he would need to commit to keep these records confidential during the appeal — irrespective of what New York law might permit. He has made no such commitment,” they wrote.

Trump’s attorneys asked the appellate court, in the event it denies Trump’s request for a stay pending appeal, to grant an administrative stay to give the Supreme Court time to consider Trump’s stay application.


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Trump says he won’t meet with Jacob Blake’s family because they wanted to involve lawyers

“Well, I spoke to the (family’s) pastor … and I thought it would be better not to do anything where there were lawyers involved. They wanted me to speak. They wanted to have lawyers involved and I thought that was inappropriate, so I didn’t do that. But I did speak with the pastor of the family,” Trump said.

The President said he and the pastor had “a great talk,” adding, “I may at some point do that, but they did have a lawyer that wanted to be on the phone and I said no. That’s inappropriate, but I did just give my best regards.”

Asked about Trump’s comments by CNN’s Jim Acosta on “The Situation Room,” Benjamin Crump, an attorney for the Blake family, said it was a routine practice for his clients to have legal counsel with them when they spoke to someone in the government, including Barack Obama during his presidency and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Blake’s father told Acosta his family doesn’t have a pastor. White House senior communications adviser Ben Williamson later tweeted that Trump was referring to the pastor of the younger Blake’s mother.

“I’m not going to play politics. This is my son’s life we’re talking about,” Blake Sr. told Acosta.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told CNN’s Kaitlan Collins earlier Monday that, “Currently the plans are to meet with local law enforcement and some business owners, and he’ll survey the damage. But there will be more detailed plans forthcoming when they’re announced.”

Justin Blake, James Blake’s uncle, told CNN that Jacob Blake’s father “has no interest in speaking with President Trump.” His only interest at the moment, Justin Blake said, is his son’s well-being and getting justice.

“President Trump is a racist who stokes racial tensions. He has been stirring racial tensions since he got in the White House. Why, as Jacob’s uncle, would I want to talk to him? Our focus is on Jacob and healing the community,” Justin Blake said, adding that he hasn’t spoken with Jacob Blake’s mother about speaking with Trump.

Trump’s visit to the swing state to condemn violence during the demonstrations marks the latest apparent attempt to continue his campaign against Democrat-run cities and states.

Polls showed that Trump’s numbers tumbled after George Floyd’s death in May and the unrest that followed. So now, in the wake of another shooting of a Black man by police, it seems the President’s strategy to respond has shifted.

Throughout the Republican National Convention last week, Trump’s supporters and the President himself warned of a Democratic-run America turning cities across the country into hotbeds of violence, rioting and looting.

Trump met with Attorney General William Barr and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf Monday afternoon to discuss ongoing civil unrest across the country, two senior administration sources told CNN. And during the press conference later on Monday, Trump spoke at length about what he called “violent, left-wing civil unrest.”

And in Kenosha on Tuesday, Trump will use the city as a backdrop to make that case a couple of months before the election.

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers, a Democrat, has asked Trump to not visit Kenosha as the city works to heal and to prevent diverting local resources for a presidential visit.

“I am concerned your presence will only hinder our healing. I am concerned your presence will only delay our work to overcome division and move forward together,” Evers said in a letter to Trump.

Monday, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden charged that Trump wants to foment additional violence.

“Do you really feel safer under Donald Trump?” Biden asked repeatedly throughout a speech in Pennsylvania.

Trump is “supposed to be protecting this country. But instead he’s rooting for chaos and violence,” and is “trying to scare America,” Biden said.

Comparing to hurricane visits

Asked about the President’s motivations for visiting Kenosha, McEnany suggested the situation was akin to Trump’s recent visits to survey hurricane damage.

“First, the President wants to visit hurting Americans. He shows up, just like he showed up in Louisiana and Texas in response to Hurricane Laura,” McEnany said.

Trump has also refused to fully weigh in on the situation involving Kyle Rittenhouse, a 17-year-old charged with killing two protesters and injuring another in Kenosha.

Asked why the President liked a tweet saying Rittenhouse was a “good example” of why a Twitter user had decided to vote for Trump, McEnany said the President had told her “he just wanted to bring some attention to some of the details that aren’t as well known in that case. That the individual was being attacked and that one of the individuals who arrived on the scene did have a gun.”

However, McEnany added that the President condemns violence in all its forms.

But asked if the White House believes that citizens should stop showing up in cities, especially ones they don’t live in, with weapons to protect buildings, McEnany didn’t directly answer.

“This White House believes our police should be fully funded,” she responded. “We should have more police rather than less, we shouldn’t criticize our police because it is our police officers who are responsible for taking to the streets and protecting us.”

CNN’s Caroline Kelly, Sara Sidner, Nikki Carvajal and Geneva Sands contributed to this report.




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Why this black drive-in cinema is a big hit

Drive-in cinemas have been booming, for obvious reasons. But this one in New Jersey is also responding to the other big story of the year, by showcasing the work of black filmmakers like Jordan Peele and Spike Lee.

“I wanted to create an opportunity for black people to see themselves in a positive light,” says one of the owners.

The BBC’s Tom Brook reports.


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Personal Development & Minimalism • A podcast on Anchor

Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You to be Rich shares how to set smaller goals.
Episode 1041: Set Smaller Goals: Impress Friends, Get Girls, Lose Weight by Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You To Be Rich
Ramit wants to use money to say YES. He knew there was a better way to live a rich life—if we could use psychology to focus on what actually works. Not just for personal finance, but all aspects of life: money, careers, relationships, business, fitness, and more.
Since then, he’s been testing and sharing his findings with the world via I Will Teach You To Be Rich.
He’s also written a New York Times bestselling book, been profiled in a 6-page Fortune article, and been pictured next to Warren Buffett in Forbes Magazine, as well as been featured by a long list of media, including the Wall Street Journal, ABC News, NPR, Fox Business, PBS, CNBC, and more. He also has tons of documented success stories—more than 20,000.
The original post is located here: https://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog/set-smaller-goals-impress-friends-get-girls-lose-weight/
Please Rate & Review the Show!
Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group
and Join the Ol’ Family to get your Free Gifts!
Learn Spanish, French, Italian, German, Russian, Swedish, and more! Go to Babbel.com and use the offer code OLD to get 50% off your first 3 months!


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Donald Trump’s under-50% presidency – CNNPolitics


“I’ve been getting really good polls, some over 50%, except for one Fake Poll done by @ABC NEWS, which gives NO INFORMATION about the sample, R or D, or anything else.”

Nothing in that tweet is true.

Let’s dispel the easiest stuff first.

Even a cursory glance at the ABC-Ipsos poll Trump is referring to in the tweet — where his favorable rating sits at just 31% — reveals that Trump’s claim that there is “NO INFORMATION about the sample, R or D, or anything else” is flat wrong. Just scroll to the bottom of this page; there’s all sorts of information about how the poll was conducted and weighted.

Now, for the bigger falsehood in Trump’s tweet — that he has “been getting really good polls, some over 50%.”

While the first part of that claim is purely subjective — I don’t know what Trump considers “really good polls” — the second part is not. In fact, according to CNN polling director Jennifer Agiesta, Trump has never had a favorable rating over 50% in any methodologically sound poll. Ever. As in, when he was a private citizen and since he’s been President. Not. A. Single. One.

The best Trump has ever done? He got to 50% favorable in a 2005 Gallup poll. That was 15 years ago!

All of which is, well, remarkable.

Trump is the first president who has never broken 50% job approval in Gallup polling. The closest he came was in April and May of this year, when 49% of the public approved of the job he was doing, numbers that reflected the rally-round-the-President effect of the early days of the coronavirus. As the public has turned against Trump’s handling of Covid-19 — as the number of cases (more than 6 million) and deaths (more than 183,000) have soared — and the protests against police brutality following the death of George Floyd, the President’s approval ratings have faltered. In Gallup’s most recent poll, conducted earlier this month, just 42% approved of the job he was doing, while 55% disapproved.
Trump’s average approval rating in Gallup data is just 40% — more than 10 points less than the average number (53%) for US presidents since 1938. The only two presidents with lower approval numbers than Trump in July of their fourth year in office since World War II are Jimmy Carter (32% approval) and George H.W. Bush (36% approval). Both men lost their bids for second terms.
It’s also worth noting here that Trump, in his only run for political office, received 46% of the 2016 popular vote — losing that vote by nearly 3 million. (He has claimed repeatedly — and with no actual evidence — that 3 to 5 million people voted illegally for Clinton in 2016.)
Simply put: Donald Trump has never been someone that a majority of the country voted for or thought was doing a good job. It’s why so many Trump allies are, quietly, rooting like hell for rapper Kanye West to qualify for as many state ballots as possible — thereby lowering the win number for the incumbent.

Donald Trump is our first sub-50% president. And if he gets reelected, you can be sure it will be with less than half of the country voting for him.




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Ford to Cut 1,000 North America Salaried Jobs Amid Overhaul

(Bloomberg) — Ford Motor Co. is preparing to trim about 1,000 salaried jobs in North America, looking to its home market for savings as part of an $11 billion global restructuring begun two years ago as it projects an operating loss this year.

The job cuts are aimed at improving the automaker’s efficiency and are not related to rising costs from the coronavirus pandemic, said people familiar with the action on Monday who asked not to be identified revealing internal plans. An announcement could come as early as this week, the people said.

Ford is in the midst of a sweeping reorganization as it seeks to reverse declining fortunes and achieve what Chief Executive Officer Jim Hackett calls financial “fitness.” The company expects to report a full-year operating loss for the first time in a decade.

Last year, Ford closed plants and eliminated thousands of jobs in Europe, where it has been losing money. In North America — the automaker’s most profitable region thanks to F-Series pickups — the cutbacks are smaller and are expected to come in the form of voluntary buyouts. They are in addition to 2,300 previously announced salaried job reductions in the U.S. during Hackett’s tenure.

Ford cut 7,000 salaried positions worldwide last year in the first round of the global overhaul. Those reductions were expected to save the company $600 million a year. The carmaker had a worldwide workforce of 190,000 people at the end of 2019.

A Ford spokesman declined to comment on the latest cuts.

BMW Cuts

The pain of the pandemic also is being felt keenly elsewhere in the auto industry, with BMW AG planning unspecified cuts to its U.S. salaried workforce to cope. The German automaker is reducing headcount “to align with current market conditions,” a spokesman said Monday. BMW’s sales in North America slid almost 40% in the second quarter.

Ford’s latest retrenchment comes as Hackett prepares to retire and make way for Jim Farley, who becomes CEO Oct. 1. Farley has promised to “swing for the fences” and return Ford’s North American region to a 10% profit margin. His first big test will be the complicated launch of a redesigned version of the cash-cow F-150 pickup at two U.S. factories.

Farley, who helped guide the company through a two-month shutdown at the outset of the pandemic, has said he sees a resolve in the workforce reminscent of the company’s existential crisis during the Great Recession of 2009.

“Everyone at Ford knows the situation we’re in,” Farley said just before becoming chief operating officer March 1. “I can see it on the faces of my colleagues and it takes me back to about 10 years ago. I’ve seen the look before.”

The new round of white-collar job eliminations was first reported by StreetInsider.com.

(Upates with BMW job cuts in U.S. from seventh paragraph)

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


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Tenet earns $53M in risky COVID-19 debut

The first wave of big new movies released since the beginning of the pandemic, including Christopher Nolan’s mind-bending thriller Tenet and the long-delayed X-Men spinoff The New Mutants, arrived in theatres over the weekend, testing the waters of a radically different theatrical landscape.

Warner Bros.’ Tenet — the most hotly anticipated movie of the year and the one that has repeatedly positioned itself to lead the return of multiplex moviegoing — opened with an estimated $53 million US overseas in 41 markets, including most of Europe, South Korea and Canada. 

Given the circumstances, it was difficult to forecast the performance of the $200 million Tenet, starring John David Washington, Robert Pattinson and Elizabeth Debicki. But the result exceeded the expectations of most. Toby Emmerich, chairman of Warner Bros. Pictures Group, called it “a fantastic start.”

“Given the unprecedented circumstances of this global release we know we’re running a marathon, not a sprint, and look forward to long playability for this film globally for many weeks to come,” said Emmerich in a statement.

While many of Hollywood’s largest productions have postponed their release and others have rerouted to streaming platforms, Warner Bros. gambled that Tenet could roll out abroad first, and then gradually debut in the U.S. 

WATCH: CBC film critic heads back to the cinema for Tenet:

After a five-month absence from movie theatres because of the coronavirus, the CBC’s Eli Glasner headed back to the cinema for his first post-COVID-19 lockdown press screening — Christopher Nolan’s long-anticipated Tenet. 4:08

So far, it seems to be working. The overseas opening for Tenet was greeted by some as proof that blockbuster moviegoing can be resurrected even while the virus continues to circulate and large indoor gatherings are considered higher risk. As part of  their safety protocols, movie theatres are mandating mask wearing, cleaning cinemas in between showings and operating at 50 per cent capacity to distance moviegoers usually crowded shoulder to shoulder.

“The strong international debut of Christopher Nolan’s Tenet is an emphatic statement that audiences around the world are ready to return to theatres where local guidelines allow,” said Rich Gelfond, chief executive of IMAX. The large-format exhibitor accounted for $5 million of the film’s box office. 

In nine markets, including Ukraine and the Netherlands, Tenet did better than any previous movie directed by Nolan, including The Dark Knight. It was the largest opening yet in Saudi Arabia, which in 2018 ended its ban on cinemas. In the United Kingdom, Tenet accounted for 74 per cent of ticket sales, Warner Bros. said.

Tenet will open this week in the U.S. and China, the two largest markets. In the U.S., the conditions remain far from ideal. About 60 per cent of theatres are currently open. The largest chains, including AMC and Regal, reopened the week prior. Any new release is trying to coax moviegoers back to the movies — any movie — in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In the U.S. over the weekend, the Walt Disney Co.’s The New Mutants, a critically panned horror riff for Marvel made by 20th Century Fox before the Disney acquisition, led the domestic box office with an estimated $7 million in 2,412 locations. Cathleen Taff, Disney’s president of global distribution, called it a success for times requiring recalibrated expectations.

“We continue to have faith and believe in the theatrical experience. We think consumers are ready to start having that experience with others sooner rather than later,” Taff said. “We’re encouraged. We’re very encouraged.”

Disney will next week release the live-action remake of Mulan for a $30 digital rental through its streaming service, Disney+. Originally slated for theatrical release in March, it’s the most expensive movie yet to go straight to the home. Taff, though, said she’s optimistic about upcoming releases coming to theatres.

“Of course it’s not going to be a linear process. We’ve been upended for sure, along with many other industries. But we have to continue to pivot and adjust our approach in real time,” said Taff. “Right now we’re feeling pretty good.”

Many U.S. theatres still closed

Theatres remain closed in several states, including New York and California. On Friday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom released guidelines that could allow county-by-country reopening of cinemas.

United Artists Releasing’ Bill & Ted Face the Music debuted Friday on video-on-demand. The company didn’t provide rental grosses Sunday, but it also put Bill and Ted in 1,007 North American theatres where it made just shy of $1.1 million.

Theatrical release may be harder for adult-skewing specialty fare whose audiences are historically harder to get out of the house. Fox Searchlight’s The Personal History David Copperfield, a Charles Dickens adaptation by Armando Iannucci (Veep), opened with $520,000 from 1,360 theatres.

“The results, while modest, signal a return to the cinema for moviegoers who are yearning for the majesty of the big screen,” said Frank Rodriguez, distribution head for Searchlight. 


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Personal Development & Minimalism • A podcast on Anchor

Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You to be Rich shares how to set smaller goals.
Episode 1041: Set Smaller Goals: Impress Friends, Get Girls, Lose Weight by Ramit Sethi of I Will Teach You To Be Rich
Ramit wants to use money to say YES. He knew there was a better way to live a rich life—if we could use psychology to focus on what actually works. Not just for personal finance, but all aspects of life: money, careers, relationships, business, fitness, and more.
Since then, he’s been testing and sharing his findings with the world via I Will Teach You To Be Rich.
He’s also written a New York Times bestselling book, been profiled in a 6-page Fortune article, and been pictured next to Warren Buffett in Forbes Magazine, as well as been featured by a long list of media, including the Wall Street Journal, ABC News, NPR, Fox Business, PBS, CNBC, and more. He also has tons of documented success stories—more than 20,000.
The original post is located here: https://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog/set-smaller-goals-impress-friends-get-girls-lose-weight/
Please Rate & Review the Show!
Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com and in The O.L.D. Facebook Group
and Join the Ol’ Family to get your Free Gifts!
Learn Spanish, French, Italian, German, Russian, Swedish, and more! Go to Babbel.com and use the offer code OLD to get 50% off your first 3 months!


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Biden condemns looting and rioting: ‘It’s lawlessness, plain and simple’


“Do you really feel safer under Donald Trump?” Biden asked repeatedly in a speech in Pittsburgh.

The speech opened a new phase of the 2020 election, with both parties’ national conventions now completed and Biden beginning to travel to swing states. In his first major campaign event after last week’s Republican convention, the former vice president delivered a forceful response to Trump and his allies’ racially charged claims that the looting and property damage that has taken place amid protests over racial injustice in some cities would spread to the suburbs if Biden is elected in November.

Biden condemned violence and destruction, calling it an affront to the tactics of civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and John Lewis.

“I want to be very clear about all of this: Rioting is not protesting. Looting is not protesting. Setting fires is not protesting. None of this is protesting. It’s lawlessness, plain and simple. And those who do it should be prosecuted,” Biden said. “Violence will not bring change, it will only bring destruction. It’s wrong in every way.”

Responding to Trump’s claims that the suburbs, where Trump needs to win back White voters who have abandoned the GOP in droves on his watch, would not be safe if Biden wins, Biden asked, incredulously: “You know me. You know my heart. You know my story, my family’s story. Ask yourself: Do I look like a radical socialist with a soft spot for rioters? Really?”

He also condemned Trump, whose armed supporters have been involved in violent clashes with protesters, saying his refusal to call on his own supporters to “stop acting as an armed militia in this country shows how weak he is.”

Biden then challenged Trump much more directly than he had in his speech on the final night of the Democratic convention, where he didn’t use Trump’s name. On Monday, he said the President will “do anything to hold onto political power.”

“Donald Trump has been a toxic presence in our nation for four years,” Biden said. “Will we rid ourselves of this toxin? Or will we make it a permanent part of our nation’s character?”

He cast Trump’s “law and order” message as designed to instill fear, and said Trump is ignoring the reality that “he is President, whether he knows it or not.”

Biden called Trump’s “subservient role” to Russian President Vladimir Putin humiliating and embarrassing, and lambasted Trump over reports that Russian operatives had offered bounties to the Taliban to kill US soldiers.

“Not even American troops can feel safer under President Trump,” Biden said.

Biden also defended his own political record, pointing to the efforts of former President Barack Obama’s administration to stave off a depression during the 2009 economic collapse. He also said GOP characterizations of him as damaging to energy jobs in areas like western Pennsylvania are false.

“I am not banning fracking,” Biden said. “Let me say that again: I am not banning fracking, no matter how many times Donald Trump lies about me.”

And, directly addressing racial unrest, Biden cast himself as a bridge between peaceful protesters who object to police violence that disproportionately affects Black Americans and local elected officials and law enforcement.

“I’m confident I can bring the police to the table, as well,” Biden said.

The speech comes at a fraught moment, ahead of Trump’s Tuesday trip — against the wishes of Wisconsin’s Democratic governor, Tony Evers — to Kenosha, a city wracked with violence following the police shooting of a 29-year-old Black man, Jacob Blake, the property damage and looting that followed, and the killing of two protesters there.

Trump and the Republican Party last week closed a convention focused on the theme of “law and order,” painting a deeply distorted picture of cities subsumed by street violence that would soon spread to the suburbs, where he needs to rebuild his standing with White voters in order to defeat Biden, if he does not win reelection.

The political landscape in the wake of both parties’ conventions is murky, though polls this week could make clear whether Biden or Trump received a substantial boost exiting the conventions and whether their content changed the way Americans view issues such as police brutality, protests and civic violence.

Trump appears to be inciting unrest on Twitter, such as praising a convoy of supporters heading into restive Portland, Oregon, as “Great Patriots.” He also “liked” a Twitter post encouraging people to read a thread of tweets that in part praised Kyle Rittenhouse, a 17-year-old charged with allegedly killing two protestors in Kenosha.

Biden’s return to the trail also comes after months in which he has seldom traveled outside the Delaware and Philadelphia areas, with the pandemic leading his campaign’s health advisers to conclude that doing so wasn’t feasible.

He said he plans to resume swing state travel soon, telling supporters at a recent virtual fundraiser that Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Arizona and Minnesota are states where visits are in the works.

His wife, Jill Biden, plans on Tuesday to kick off what the campaign is calling a “back-to-school” combination of virtual and in-person events in eight states — Michigan, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Florida, Nevada, Minnesota, Arizona and Pennsylvania — that are all 2020 election battlegrounds, though it’s not yet clear how many of those states she will visit in person.

This story has been updated with more from Biden’s remarks.

CNN’s Stephen Collinson contributed to this report.


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